Book Reviews

OCTOBER 2017

The Black Advancement book of the month is Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-first Century by Monique W. Morris.  “There are lies, there are damn lies, and there are statistics” is often a phrase used to show how data can be manipulated to support whatever one wishes. This book however does more than give numbers, it gives a snapshot of how Black Americans are fairing in the 21st century.  Using the information from this book, We can see where Our efforts need to be directed in the Black Community and also where We can make a path for the youth.

SEPTEMBER 2017

The Black Advancement book of the month is White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide by Carol Anderson Ph.D.  The acclaimed historian takes this opportunity to show the systematic attack against Black Americans since the end of the Civil War to current day, circa 2016.  Anderson breaks down the planned and mobilized efforts to keep the false narrative of white supremacy alive and how it has been cloaked in political dog-whistling, policies, and rhetoric in order to justify it.  This book is the goto to bolster your points when in a discussion on what White privilege is.

AUGUST 2017

The Black Advancement book of the month is Our Black Year: One Family’s Quest to Buy Black in America’s Racially Divided Economy  by Maggie Anderson.  This book exposes the plight of both Black businesses and the Black buyers.  Considering how big of consumers Black people are it would be a huge benefit to all of Us to buy Black, however the truth is We neither have the businesses or unity yet to make buying Black major.  Lucky for all of Us, Maggie Anderson created the blueprint through trial and effort.  This book is right on time and should be used as a touchstone for the future of Black America.

JULY 2017

The Black Advancement book of the month is Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman Jr.  The justice system within the US has long been an issue for Black people and has proven to be bias against Us. One overlooked aspect however, has been Our contribution to high rates of Black prisoners in the name of safety.  James Forman Jr. does the dirty work of showing the misguided policies and opinions of some of Our leaders that lead to the mass incarceration of entire generation of Black folks. Like Cam Newton says “Hindsight is 50 50”!

JUNE 2017

The Black Advancement book of the month is Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America by Ira Berman.  If the past 12 months have taught Us anything, it has taught Us the strength of a vote, or in this past election, the lack there of.  Berman evokes the speech delivered by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  when he asked legislatures to grant Blacks the ability to exercise their civic duty and reflects on the modern tricks employed by political parities to prevent voter participation.  By exposing the shameless acts of legislations throughout the nation, he also exposes the hypocrisy of what America is suppose to represent compared to the ugly reality.  This book is right on time and should be used as a touchstone for anyone invested in the future of politics in America.

MAY 2017

The Black Advancement book of the month is Black Privilege: Opportunity Comes to Those Who Create It by CharIamagne Tha God.  This book has been critically acclaimed and praised by a variety of public figures.  The premise of the book is to be honest to yourself and true to your truths.  Using examples from his own life experiences, Charlemagne shows that belief and passion are just as important as formal training and is the living embodiment of making your own lane and driving to the finish.  A very necessary read for the Black youth and very timely for Black adults!

APRIL 2017

The Black Advancement book of the month is Whitewashing Race: The Myth of a Color-Blind Society by Michael K. Brown, Martin CarnoyElliott CurrieTroy DusterDavid B. OppenheimerMarjorie M. Schultz, and David Wellman.  There has long been a gap in the way that White and Black Americans see America as a society.  While many White Americans are under the mindset that racism is all but gone, Black Americans have stood steadfast in their collective opinion that racism is alive and kicking.  This book address these opinions through the voice of experts from fields varying from sociologists to economists.  The results are enlightening and necessary.

MARCH 2017

The Black Advancement book of the month is When Affirmative Action Was White: An Untold History of Racial Inequality in Twentieth Century America by Ira Katznelson.  This book accurately focuses on all of the government programs created to, and greatly did, benefit the white working class American.  We really wanted to draw attention to this book because it clearly shows the hypocricy displayed by the white working class of America on issues of fairness and assistance for any other population within the United States.  This book will make many of the points readers may feel but never knew how to verbalize or give a specific examples of white privilege. A must read and a must share!

FEBRUARY 2017

The Black Advancement book of the month is Why Are All the Black Kid Sitting Together in the Cafeteria: And Other Conversations About Race by  Beverly Daniel Tatum.  I was originally informed about and recommended this book by my cousin.  She told me “this book sounds like it fits into your Black Administration thing.”  Disrespect aside, (just kidding family) her assessment of the book was accurate.  Tatum ask the question people both want and need to ask when it comes to dealing with race in America.  By showing many micro interactions and examples, Tatum has captured the macro problems involved with the nations ongoing issue with race relations.

JANUARY 2017

The Black Advancement book of the month is Racial Matters: The FBI’s Secret File on Black America, 1960-1972 by Kenneth O’Reilly.  Considering the climate of protest and political upheaval over this past year, Our first book harkens back to a time with similar circumstances.  O’Reilly focuses on the FBI’s systematic and disturbing practice of destroying groups, particularly Black groups, who fought against the oppressive forces and laws in America.  His book shows the dirty details on how far the government will go to protect it’s system, even if it’s wrongheaded.  A good reminder that just because We aren’t the main course, doesn’t mean We still aren’t on the menu.

DECEMBER 2016

The Black Advancement book of the month is Spectacle: The Astonishing Life of Ota Benga by  Pamela Newkirk.  Although this book centers on the mistreatment Ota Benga, the real shame of the story is the wide acceptability of this mistreatment.  Newkirk puts up the mirror of history and the reflection is ugly, honest, and exhibits the power of an agenda.  The children of America need more books like this so they can understand how deep the issues of race are embedded into the hearts, minds, and history of Our country!!!

NOVEMBER 2016

The Black Advancement book of the month is Black Ice by Lorene Cary.  We here at BA Inc. have had the fortune to know some pretty extraordinary people and they tend to pull our legs to up and coming artist, poets, and authors.  In the case of Lorene Cary, this very scenario took place.  The book that was recommended to Us from Lorene Cary, Black Ice, has drawn comparisons to other great memoirs from the likes of Maya Angelou.  Cary draws from her experience as the groundbreaker in a world constructed to keep her out and writes  a fascinating account how she made her way through.  This book will further expose hard truths We all already know about America and show how much a persons will can overcome any and all obstacles.

OCTOBER 2016

The Black Advancement book of the month is A People’s History of the United States by Howard  Zinn.   This book is widely considered one of the best history books ever written  about the history of the United States of America.  By reading this book you will be able to see and understand how we as a nation have gotten to this point and make up your own mind on whether America was ever truly great, let alone great again .  Great read…better yet…must read!!!

SEPTEMBER 2016

The Black Advancement book of the month is The Isis Papers: The Key to the Colors by Dr. Frances Cress Welsing.  As We looked through  Our bevy of selections for B.A. Books of the Month, We were remise this book was not featured already.   Before documentaries like Hidden Colors, this book talked about the physiological warfare of racism and how impactful it is on the mental state of Black people.  Her theories and reasoning will force any reader to reexamine moments, actions, and reactions from their past.  This book has been proven to be a can’t miss and a must read….what are you waiting for go find it and read it!

AUGUST 2016

The Black Advancement book of the month is Prince of Darkness: The Untold Story of Jeremiah G. Hamilton, Wall Street’s First Black Millionaire by Shane White.  Prince of Darkness reveals the life of one of the most successful men of his era.  Follow Jeremiah Hamilton through the words and research of Shane White as he chronicles the struggles and success of his incredible story.  He was a man revered and hated by his peers for not only his skin color but also for his keen wit and unwillingness to conform to the “social norms” of the day.  This book is yet another example of Black people overcoming impossible odds and will leave the reader wondering how many more of Our stories are untold?  Good thing you have free membership to the BA Book of the Month Club!!!

JULY 2016

The Black Advancement book of the month is Blood Brothers: The Fatal Friendship Between Muhammad Ali and Malcolm X by Randy Roberts and Johnny Smith.  Blood Brothers chronicles the relationships between the Honorable Elijah Muhammad, Malcolm X and Muhammad Ali and how the friendship between X and Ali was frowned upon by everyone who held sway on them personally and professionally.  This riveting book will leave the reader tired and restless from lack of sleep due to the intrigue and great writing within its pages.  Stamp of approval!!!

JUNE 2016

The Black Advancement book of the month is Muhammad Ali in Perspective byThomas Hauser with the cooperation of Muhammed Ali.  In honor of the G.O.A.T. and his recent passing, We decided to chose a book that embodies the champion in stunning pictorial and literary forms.  He was so full of life and color that his life can be best described in photos.  With approximately 170 pages each containing beautiful photos and quotes from people in his life, the brashness, the defiant, the overcomer, the champion, the Greatest is fully captured.  We salute you Champ, and may We all one day have the boldness and courage of Our convictions to establish and accomplish Our life’s goals with the speed and the grace of the Butterfly…Muhammad Ali.

MAY 2016

The Black Advancement book of the month is The Family Tree: A Lynching in Georgia, a Legacy of Secrets, and My Search for the Truth by Karen Branan.  This magnificent book was brought to Our attention by Ronald Martin’s TVOne News Now Show.  This non fictional account of Karen Branan’s family history speaks to the messy, twisted, and ugly nature of America and its ongoing issues with its original sin.  As a young women Karen noticed her parents, who she deems as having racist attitudes, never discussed the issue of race in a reasonable tone.  This issues came to the forefront when Karen discovers she was going to become a Grandmother to a half Black child, fearing that her son would be disowned by her mother and father.  This fear makes Karen confront the hidden issue of race head on and what she discovers crushes and frees her.

APRIL 2016

The Black Advancement book of the month is Showing My Color: Impolite Essays on Race in America by Clarence Page. This collection of essays gives a different perspectives from the norm on both race and gender relations in America.  Although the title points to an uncomfortable read, Page applies his logic to his argument and creates a more open dialogue and open mindedness, rather then shutting down the conversation.

MARCH 2016

The Black Advancement book of the month is The Ways of White Folks by Langston Hughes.  This collection of short stories by the legendary poet is an eye opening look at race relations in America during the early decades of last century.  Although this book is more than 75 years old, it still is relevant today’s America; proving these problems aren’t new and are not going away anytime soon.

FEBRUARY 2016

The Black Advancement book of the month is Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul by Eddie S. Glaude Jr.  This book speaks to the continuing struggle for Black people within America and how the promises made at the founding of the country still hasn’t been fully realized by Blacks.  It also focuses on the policies that have reenforced the idea that Black Americans lives are viewed as less valuable than our white counterparts.  This book is a great read, especially considering that this is an election year.

JANUARY 2016

The Black Advancement book of the month is Martin Luther King and The Montgomery Story: How 50,000 Negroes Found A New Way To End Racial Discrimination Edited by Martin Luther King and the Fellowship of Reconciliation. This old comic book was used to influence and explain the movement to the younger generation and helped spread the word about the non-violent strategy.  Although dated and for a younger audience, anyone would benefit from reading this piece of history.

DECEMBER 2015

The Black Advancement book of the month is And Still We Rise: The Trials and Triumphs of Twelve Gifted Inner-City Students by Miles Corwin.  This non-fiction late 90’s page turner was a national bestseller and is one of the most fascinating reads in Our collection.  The reader will find themselves in awe of the backgrounds of all the main characters and wishing for a happy ending.  Only when the reader takes a breath do they remember that everything they are reading was real and that these remarkably resilient kids are living these events.  An A+ story and a must read.

NOVEMBER 2015

The Black Advancement book of the month is Bastards of the Reagan Era by Reginald Dwayne Betts.  Full disclosure, we heard about this book through Slate’s Political Gabfest.  Fortunately for Us, we followed up to see why they made such a big deal over the book and we are glad we did.  If you love real and raw poetry, this book is worth the read.

OCTOBER 2015

The Black Advancement book of the month is Negroland: A Memoir by Margo Jefferson.  Negroland is a rare look inside the elitist class of Black society during the era of segregation.  This book bares the soul and the unflattering perspective of the “Talented Tenth” and how intra-racism played a role back then and how it still effect the Black Community.  Interesting, frustrating, sad, tough read….all the things that a book of the month should be.

SEPTEMBER 2015

The Black Advancement book of the month is The Beast Side: Living (and Dying) While Black in America by D Watkins.  This book chronicles the life of D Watkins during the crack era in East Baltimore and his transformation from being a successful drug dealer to his transition into becoming a college professor and author.  His fascinating life is worth a book and definitely worth book of the month honors.

AUGUST 2015

The Black Advancement book of the month is Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates.  Between the World and Me is one of the most critically acclaimed books of the year.  It has brought the Baltimore writer the recognition that has been reserved for the likes of Toni Morrison, Maya Angelou, and James Baldwin.  Between the World and Me isn’t just good enough to be the book of the month, but is legitimately one of the best books in our growing library.  Pick up this book and see what the buzz is all about and why they will be reading and referring to this book for generations to come.

JULY 2015

The Black Advancement book of the month is Black Power: The Politics of Liberation by Kwame Ture (formerly Stokley Carmichael)  and Charles V. Hamilton.  This book spoke to the Black Power Movement back in the late 1960’s and revealed an ambition that has since halted.  However, the framework left behind by some of America’s greatest generations spokesmen and women is left behind for us to pick up.  Before one can act, one must know, this book can assists, perhaps in both realms.

 JUNE 2015

The Black Advancement book of the month is The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo by Tom Reiss.  This book is about General Alex Dumas, who was the son of a Haitian slave and Frenchmen who became one of the greatest unknown warriors in history.  His name may seem familiar to readers however because his son, world famous author of the “The Three Musketeers” and “The Count of Monte Cristo,” Alexandre Dumas.  If you want to know the story behind the stories, you need to read this book.

MAY 2015

The Black Advancement book of the month is The Presidency in Black and White: My Up-Close View of Three Presidents and Race in America by April Ryan.  This book is an insiders look at the issues of race and it’s impact on the last few Presidential Administration.  April Ryan’s unique access and position provide details to the reader that exhibits how the issue of race still haunts every leader of the United States.  A terrific read that belongs as one of the BA Book of the Month winners.

 APRIL 2015

The Black Advancement book of the month is Brotherman: The Odyssey of Black Men In America-An Anthology edited by Herb Boyd and Robert L. Allen.  This book lends itself to the narratives and perspectives of Black man in America from the times of slavery through the modern day athlete.  A riveting award winning book that will not only inform the reader but entrap the reader.  Truly worthy of BA Book of the Month status.

 MARCH 2015

The Black Advancement book of the month is Atlas of World History edited by Kate Santon and Liz Mckay.  This book does a great job showing the effects of conquers, treaties, and wars on the world.  If you want to understand the present you must be aware of the past.  This book makes that possible.

FEBRUARY 2015

The Black Advancement book of the month is The Partisan Divide: Crisis in Congress  by Tom Davis, Martin Frost, and Richard Cohen.  If you really want understand the current situation in congress and in the country, this is the book for you.  Former Congressmen Tom Davis and  Martin Frost breakdown the breakdown in Washington and show the reader how Congress actions (or lack there of) effect the every day American.

JANUARY 2015

The Black Advancement book of the month is Hand in Hand: Ten Black Men Who Changed America by Andrea Davis Pinkney and Brian Pinkney.  What better way to start the new year then to introduce your children to 10 American heroes.  This book is wonderfully written and illustrated and gives great mini bios of people from Benjamin Banneker to President Barack Obama.  A great way to start the year indeed.

DECEMBER 2014

The Black Advancement book of the month is Breaking The Chains of Bondage: Black History From Its Origins in Africa to the Present by Norman E.W. Hodges Ph.D.  Although this book is dated the information provided within its pages are extremely interesting and beneficial.  The book was written in the midst of the post Civil Rights  Era, when heavyweights such as Jesse Jackson and Stokley Carmichael’s legacies were still in the balance.  This perspective will definitely give the reader a sign of how far we have come, but more important how far we have to go.

NOVEMBER 2014

The Black Advancement book of the month is March: Book One by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell.  This book is fantastic for all ages.  The artwork is eye-popping and the story is captivating.  For parents struggling to inform how to deal with the history of race in this county to their young children, this book can be the bridge to understanding and may very well lead to more deep discussion.

OCTOBER 2014

The Black Advancement book of the month is No Struggle No Progress: A Warrior’s Life From Black Power to Education Reform by Howard Fuller and Lisa Frazier Page.  This book caught Our attention, for obvious reasons, first for it’s title.  However, as the reader begins to read this book they become trapped by it’s compelling story.  A book shouldn’t be judge just by it’s cover, No Struggle No Progress is living and breathing truth of that fact.

SEPTEMBER 2014

The Black Advancement book of the month is The Teacher Wars: A History of America’s Most Embattled Profession by Dana Goldstein.  Teaching is one of the most highly praised and faulted professions in America.  It is also one of the most important components of perhaps the most important element of American society.  This book gives you the history of all the issues that have made teachers the scapegoats and the heroes that we view them as today.

AUGUST 2014

The Black Advancement book of the month is I Got Schooled:The Unlikely Story of How a Moonlighting Movie Maker Learned the Five Keys to Closing America’s Education Gap by M. Night Shyamalan.  We became intrigued with this book when Shyamalan held a discussion about the book on CSPAN.  I Got Schooled highlights the common features of successful schools and has the potential to become a “how to” for failing schools.  In the hands of the right people the ideas fostered in this book could even possibly bridge the gap between the have and have nots.  That’s why this movie makers book is B.A. Inc.’s Book of the Month for August.

JULY 2014

The Black Advancement book of the month is The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace: A Brilliant Young Man Who Left Newark For The Ivy League by Jeff Hobbs.  We originally heard about this book by way of NPR.  The author, Jeff Hobbs, was one of Robert Peace’s roommates at Yale.  Hobbs was so moved by his death and the manner in which he died that he felt compelled to ask those who knew him best about his life.  Out of those stories came a heartfelt, and riveting biography of the short life of a talented young African-American man who escapes the slums of Newark for Yale University only to succumb to the dangers of the streets—and of one’s own nature—when he returns home.  This book will bring the reader up close and personal with all issues that impact not only Black youth specifically, but America as a whole.

JUNE 2014

The Black Advancement book of the month is I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou.  This book is not only one of the most influential books of the 20th century, it also helped introduce one of the most influential people of the 20th century.  With her recent, passing this month couldn’t have been represented by anyone else.  Please join Black Advancement Inc. in celebrating the life and the legacy of one of the true titans of our age by reading this literary classic by the one and only Maya Angelou.

MAY 2014

The Black Advancement book of the month is The Truth About Retirement Plans and IRAs by Ric Edelman.  This book gives was highly recommend and well worth the read.  Ric Edelman makes the dry and often times complicated world of finance fascinating and easy to understand.  With his knowledge and graphics he points out the pitfalls and the misnomers of retirement and shows the reader that it’s never to late but it’s to start early.  Of all the books outside of the BA Credit Commandments, of course, this is the first place one should consult when planning for life after work.

APRIL 2014

The Black Advancement book of the month is Ruth and the Green Book by Calvin Alexander Ramsey, Gwen Strauss and illustrated by Floyd Cooper.  Although this book is intended for children, the complexity and the enormity of the situation is for all ages.  The Green Book was a guide through the segregated south of places to stay and eat for Black people.  This book opens the eyes of all who read it and is highly recommended.

MARCH 2014

The Black Advancement book of the month is The Egyptian Book of the Dead (Book of Coming To Day From Night Forth) edited and translated by E.A. Wallis Budge.  This book gives a line by line interpretation of the famed “Book of the Dead.”  Some historians would argue that many of the great religions of the world were spawned from some of the stories in this ancient text.  Read it for yourself and then you be the Budge….I mean judge. 

FEBRUARY 2014

The Black Advancement book of the month is Black Chronicle edited by Maloyd Ben Wilson Jr.  This fascinating read chronicles the struggles of Blacks here in America through all of the famous newspaper clippings from as early as the Revolutionary War through the Civil Rights Movement.  This book gives you the history in its native tongue and has the ability to teleport you to whatever era you choose to read.  An excellent book for anyone seeking a true representation of Black peoples history within America….act fast though, there are only a limited amount of copies of this historical gem.

JANUARY 2014

The Black Advancement book of the month is Mandela edited by Mac Maharaj and Ahmed Kathrada.  The world morned on December 5, 2013 when the civil rights titan Nelson Mandela died.  This book gives readers the opportunity to follow his life and see why he was truly one of greatest people to have ever lived.

DECEMBER 2013

The Black Advancement book of the month is the Autobiography of a Freedom Rider: My Life as a Foot Solider for Civil Rights by Thomas M. Armstrong and Natalie R. Bell. This book is an autobiographical tale of Thomas M. Armstrong.  It takes the reader through the times and trials of the movement from the grunt perspective.  This book is not only a great example of the struggle of Black folks but more importantly, it shows the level of detail and strategy used by these groups to combat the system of segregation.

NOVEMBER 2013

The Black Advancement book of the month is Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington. This book is an autobiographical tale of Booker T. Washington’s personal and painstaking pursuit of freedom for himself and his ideals for the Black man in America.  This book shares a different and some what controversial perspective on the struggle of Blacks during this period and shows the diversity of opinion on how to confront the color line.

OCTOBER 2013

The Black Advancement book of the month is The Souls of Black Folk by W.E.B. DuBois.  This book is a classic work of American literature and is considered a cornerstone of African-American literary. This book contains several essays on race, in which DuBois drew from his own experiences to develop this groundbreaking work on being African-American in American society.  The Souls of Black Folk also holds an important place in social science as one of the early works to deal with sociology.

SEPTEMBER 2013

The Black Advancement book of the month is Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave by Frederick Douglass.  This book chronicles the famous abolitionist life journey from being a slave to becoming one of the most revered people in American history.  This book should be recommended reading for every high school student to better understand the history of America.  More than that, it puts a proper perspective of where we have come from as a nation and how far we still need to go.

AUGUST 2013

The Black Advancement book of the month is Principles of Politics and Government by Edwin M. Coulter.  Although a little dated this book is extremely informative on the differences of all the known governmental systems both in and outside of the United States.  This will give the reader the necessary background and information to decide for themselves what governmental systems work and make sense of what others say when they claim to be of a certain political ilk.  Bottom line this book should be required reading before going to the polls.

JULY 2013

The Black Advancement book of the month is The Ugly American by Eugene Burdick and William J. Lederer.  This book exposes the inefficient foreign policies that had and to continue to plague the United States.  Although the issues are dated the problems remain the same for our country.  This is an excellent read for anybody who aspires to go into employment or who is just interested in international affairs.

JUNE 2013

The Black Advancement book of the month is Quotations of Benjamin FranklinVolume 1 by BenjaminFranklin.  This quick little read of slick sayings and quips by one of America’s founding fathers contains great wisdom, insight and advise from a man wise beyond his years both in age and era.  Many of his quotes are not only brilliant, they are also timeless.  If you are looking for a quick dose of perspective at your job or while handling your business in the bathroom this book is perfect.

MAY 2013

The Black Advancement book of the month is 12 Angry Men: True Stories of Being a Black Man in America Today edited by Gregory S. Park and Matthew W. Hughey.   This book brings to life the tension that exist between the Black Community and law enforcement.  With laws enacted in New York such as “Stop and Frisk” and the all to common “DWB” stories of everyone from Law Professors to young brothers visiting relatives, 12 Angry Men is a real and vivid perspective of how law enforcement officers tend to abuse their power specifically against Black people.  This book should be read by every rookie law enforcement officer and anybody who wants to know they are not alone when it comes to being victims of overzealous officers.

APRIL 2013

The Black Advancement book of the month is Believe: The Words and Inspiration of Archbishop Desmond Tutu (MeWe) written by A Blue Mountain Art Collection. The brief story of the life and quotes of Archbishop Desmond Tutu reveals the power of love.  Love for your fellow man, your God, and yourself.  This short but special book will not only endear the reader to the man Desmond Tutu but it will also inspire you to strive to be a better person and to love in spite of and because of.  In the words of the Arch, MeWe.

MARCH 2013

The Black Advancement book of the month is Great Speeches By African Americans edited by James Daley. This book is filled with rich history and incredible orators.  All issues dealing with the African American struggle from lynching to the constitution being a living document are addressed in these world altering speeches.   See the struggle from the beginning and the leaders who helped us voice our frustrations and made America a better nation.

FEBRUARY 2013

The Black Advancement book of the month isTimothy Greenfield-Sanders and Elvis Mitchell’s The Black List.  This book is a perfect pick for Black History month.  This book chronicles the interviews the authors have with successful Black people from Colin Powell to Slash of Guns n Roses.  The perspectives given and gained from this book are not only enriching but also interesting enough to have any reader of any race stand back and reread the hardships, personal battles, and achievements of these varied Black stars.

JANUARY 2013

The Black Advancement book of the month is Farai Chideya’s Don’t Believe The Hype: Fighting Cultural Misinformation About African-Americans.  This book is dated, however it has thought altering statistics and thought provoking text.  This is an excellent book, the only problem that I have with it, is that Farai Chideya has not written another one.

DECEMBER 2012

The Black Advancement book of the month is Lushena Books The Willie Lynch Letter And The Making Of A Slave.  This book breaks down the tragedy and the strategy of slavery in the United States of America.  Through the use of the techniques explained and examined within this book, it gives the reader an insight to the generational damage that a system as destructive as slavery has on a population of people.  This is a must read and should be made mandatory in every US History class that broaches the topic of slavery.

NOVEMBER 2012

The Black Advancement book of the month is D.T. Niane’s Sundiata: An Epic of Old Mali.  This book is great because of it’s historical significants and it’s bigger than life characters.  However, what separates this book from many others is the way the book was recorded.  The story of Sundiata had been keep alive for years through the oral traditions of ancient African society’s.  The Griots, handed this story down generation after generation until it was finally captured in to literary form.  This book is not only a great read, it is also a harkening back to the artistry of history and legendary story telling by generations past.

OCTOBER 2012

The Black Advancement book of the month is Denise Dennis and Susan Wilmarth’s Black History For Beginners.  This book is full of facts of Black History and is written for the younger readers curious about Black History.  This book is not only highly recommended by Black Advancement Inc because of the educational value to the reader, but also because of how much fun they make it learning history.  A must have in the household!

SEPTEMBER 2012

The Black Advancement book of the month is Michael Powell’s Curious Events in History.  This book is filled with fun facts and stories of some of the stranger events that have happened from as far back as ancient Egypt to the story of the man who walked around the world.  This is a quick and fun read and has stories that are great conversation starters.

AUGUST 2012

The Black Advancement book of the month is Black Advancement Inc.’s Credit Commandments 1st Edition.  Although this may look like a shameless promotions for our organization, we highly recommend this booklet.  We have handed this booklet out to several different individuals and have received good feedback for both its information and its simplicity.   Although brief, this booklet is jammed with good sound information that is based off of personal experience and research.  Whether you are a college student, a parent, or just a financial novice this is the book for you.(This book can be found on our website by going to the Solution Tab and clicking on Credit Commandments 1st Edition)

JULY 2012

The Black Advancement book of the month is Anthony T. Browder’s Nile Valley Contributions To Civilization.  This book is one among many that the renown scholar has explored the accomplishments of ancient Africa, particularly Egypt, and history of the transfer of knowledge from the continent to the rest of the world.  Agree or disagree with his point of view, his work speaks for itself.  With historical information that will turn your perspective of history on it’s head, Browder does what people pay hundreds of thousands of dollars for, a B side to the tape of history.

JUNE 2012

The Black Advancement book of the month is Carole Boston Weatherford and Kadir Nelson’s  Moses: When Harriet Tubman Led Her People to Freedom.  Although this book is made for a younger audience, the power of both the illustrations by Kadir Nelson and the words by Carole Boston Weatherford resinate to a much older audience.  This is a must have for your children’s book collection and quite frankly your own as well.

MAY 2012

The Black Advancement book of the month is Malcolm X’s Malcolm X on Afro-American History.  This book challenges the history that most of us grow up believing K-12th grade and in some cases beyond.  Malcolm X illustrates that there are two sides to every story and that history is no different.  By reading this book you are allowing yourself the opportunity to compare perspectives and judge whether history of this ilk is simply to make Black People more proud of their own past or to complete the historical picture that our textbooks consistently fail to mention or leave out on purpose.

APRIL 2012

The Black Advancement book of the month is Cornel West’s Race Matters.  This book challenges all the issues of the Black Community and enables the reader to informatively choose where they stand on the issues.  Not only is this book worth reading for the shear brilliance of Mr. West writing, but also to expand one’s horizons and vocabulary.

MARCH 2012 

The Black Advancement book of the month is Velma Maia Thomas’ Lest We Forget.  This book gives an outstanding  look back at slavery.  Not only is it educational but also interactive with three dimensional photographs and documents from the Black Holocaust Exhibit.   Lest We Forget is just as good and informal to adults as it is for children.  Although the topic matter is emotionally draining, the experience is well worth the time, effort, and tears.

FEBRUARY 2012 

The Black Advancement book of the month is Chinua Achebe’s A Man of the People.  This book gives an inside look at politics in an emerging “democratic” nation in Africa.  This book is one of Achebe’s gifts to the world and is still handed out as part of college courses required reading.  It like many of Achebe’s books, has stood the test of time and continues to educate the naive about the way the world works in spite of our best efforts to change it.

JANUARY 2012

The Black Advancement book of the month is Oren Harari’s The Powell Principles.  This is a book about leadership from one of the greatest leaders of our time.  In this book Colin Powell breaks down his 24 principles of leadership which include the strategy and discipline that allowed him to achieve unqualified success as both the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Secretary of State. This book is a must read for all who aspire to lead, inspire, and achieve.

DECEMBER 2011

The Black Advancement book of the month is George Orwell’s Animal Farm. This book is one of the most celebrated novels of all time.  It moves as quickly as a comic book and has the sophistication of the revolution and aftermath that it was satirically based on.  Although it is traditional to read this book from the perspective of Communism versus other forms of government, I beg the reader to approach it from a different standpoint.  Rather than thinking as a bystander, think as a character in the book and then reflect on it.  This book is a classic for that very reason.

NOVEMBER 2011

The Black Advancement book of the month is Tom Wise’s White Like Me. This book is one of the most honest exploration of the history and impact of race in America that has ever been written.  Using his own life experiences as a template for his theories, Tim Wise gives stunning and heavy revelations that will have the reader turning through page after page.  His perspective is not only genuine but refreshing and necessary, and embodies what it means to try to advance.

OCTOBER 2011

The Black Advancement book of the month is Jason, David, and Guy Sims comic book Brotherman: Dictator of Discipline.  This short series of comic books chronicles a lawyer in the “Big City” that is fed up with all the crime and mischief in his home town.  This fury drives him to become Brotherman.  No matter how young or old you are you will definitely appreciate the message, the illustration, and the storyline of these comics.  The only problem with the Brotherman comic book series, is that there are so few of them.

SEPTEMBER 2011

The Black Advancement book of the month is Paul Butler’s Lets Get Free: A Hip-Hop Theory of Justice. This book examines the justice system through the eyes of  a black lawyer who comes to see the systems faults through his own personal experience.  This book takes many controversial stands and gives the reader an inside look of the justice system.  Whether you agree with the author or not this book is definitely worth reading.

AUGUST 2011

The Black Advancement book of the month is Bruce Wright’s Black Robes, White Justice. This book examines the justice system from the perspective of a black judge in New York after the civil rights movement, Bruce Wright.  If you were ever curious about the legal system in any capacity it is a must read.

JULY 2011

The Black Advancement book of the month is Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man. This book is an African American classic. It examines what it means to be young black in gifted in a racist society. If you question whether time has really changed for the plight of Black people, read this book!

JUNE 2011

The Black Advancement book of the month is Ivan Van Sertima’s They Came Before Columbus.  This book will give you another perspective on the “discovery” of America and the impact on its indigenous people from the visitors.   This book has the potential to make its reader go and relearn all they were taught k-12 and beyond.  Need I say more?

MAY 2011

The Black Advancement book of the month is Carter G. Woodson’s The Mis-Education of the Negro.  Although this book was first published in 1933, it remains one of the most topically current books for Black people.  If you are ready to hear the ugly truth, this is the book for you.

APRIL 2011

The Black Advancement book of the month is James W. Loewen’s  Lies My Teacher Told Me.  This book examines our current state of education and often times gives a different perspective on “well known” historical events in American History.  This book is fantastic and should be read by anyone who considers themselves a student, a scholar, or an out of the box thinker.

MARCH 2011

The Black Advancement book of the month is Sam Greenlee’s The Spook Who Sat By The Door. This is one of the most controversial books ever written and is still not heavily circulated due to its content.  However, it reads incredibly fast and is endlessly entertaining.  The basic premise of the book is simple, what would happen if you trained disenfranchised Black youth to run a guerrilla war against the United States government in the 1960’s?

FEBRUARY 2011

The Black Advancement book of the month is The Civil Rights Chronicles: The African-American Struggles for Freedom.  This book chronicles the three hundred year struggle of Black People since they have been in America.  Although it focuses heavily on the late 50’s and 60’s, it gives sufficient information of events that have occurred as far back as the Revolutionary War to the Rodney King Riot in the early 90’s.

2 thoughts on “Book Reviews”

  1. Check this book out ———————————————– http://www.randomhouse.com/spiegelandgrau/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9780812984897 ————————————————————————————————— ——————————————————————————————————————————————————- Promises Kept

    Written by Dr. Joe Brewster, Michele Stephenson and Hilary Beard

    Category: Education – Parent Participation; Social Science – African-American Studies; Family & Relationships – Parenting
    Format: Trade Paperback, 384 pages
    On Sale: January 2014
    Price: $ 18.00
    ISBN: 978-0-8129-8489-7 (0-8129-8489-7)

    Also available as an unabridged audiobook download and an eBook.

    As seen on PBS’s POV

    An unprecedented guide to helping black boys achieve success at every stage of their lives—at home, at school, and in the world

    Regardless of how wealthy or poor their parents are, all black boys must confront and surmount the “achievement gap”: a divide that shows up not only in our sons’ test scores, but in their social and emotional development, their physical well-being, and their outlook on life. As children, they score as high on cognitive tests as their peers, but at some point, the gap emerges. Why?

    This is the question Joe Brewster, M.D., and Michèle Stephenson asked when their own son, Idris, began struggling in a new school. As they filmed his experiences for their award-winning documentary American Promise, they met an array of researchers who had not only identified the reasons for the gap, but had come up with practical, innovative solutions to close it. In Promises Kept, they explain

    • how to influence your son’s brain before he’s even born
    • how to tell the difference between authoritarian and authoritative discipline—and why it matters
    • how to create an educational program for your son that matches his needs
    • how to prepare him for explicit and implicit racism in school and in the wider world
    • how to help your child develop resilience, self-discipline, emotional intelligence, and a positive outlook that will last a lifetime

    Filled with innovative research, practical strategies, and the voices of parents and children who are grappling with these issues firsthand, Promises Kept will challenge your assumptions and inspire you to make sure your child isn’t lost in the gap.

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Without Struggle There Is No Progress