Good Hair

Good Hairitage

Self Hatred: Good Hairitage  – Intra Racism 

The fourth installment of the Self Hatred section focuses on issue of intra racism and how it effects the Black Community.

The 3 Questions

1. Do hairstyles contribute to stereotypes about Black people even among Black people?

2. Is there any validity to the theory that slavery continues to contribute to our mentality today?

3. Are you color blind, color struck, or color stuck and why?

FRONT STREET

When we originally started the Black Advancement Inc. we were often questioned why we decided to focus specifically on Black people and Black issues.  Granted, there are several reasons and explanation for this, however one of the main pillars of our reasoning was the issue of self hatred within the Black Community.  This issue goes deep into the hearts of Black folks and can impact us in a variety of ways  including but not excluded to hairstyle, fashion, and even romantic relationship.  Our progress and struggle both hinge on our ability to get out of our own way.  With that said the question remains, do are intra-racial issues contribute to the destruction of the Black Community?

Please write in and response to our 3 poll questions or post some questions that you would like to see asked.  These question and more will be addressed during the discussion found on YouTube beginning on  10/26/2013.

Good Hairitage Part 1

Good Hairitage Part 2

Good Hairitage Part 3

 

3 thoughts on “Good Hairitage”

  1. 1. Do hairstyles contribute to stereotypes about Black people even among Black people?

    To quote the incredible MC Andre 3000, “is everybody with gold for the fall, is everybody with dreads for the cause, nah.” I believe that hair does reflect a portion of our personality and attitudes to issues in our society but I don’t put everything on it. If I see a Black women with natural hair, I tend to think that they are more intone with the struggle that our people continue to have and their blatant rejection of some western standards of beauty helps illustrate this understanding. However, this doesn’t mean that a black women with long flowing “straight” hair isn’t just as down, they just don’t show it as openly to me. Same used to be the case with brothas with locks, however do to the take over of this hairstyle by popular culture, this can no longer can be automatically inferred.

    2. Is there any validity to the theory that slavery continues to contribute to our mentality today?

    I would like to say no and say that this is an excuse that we use for our more than common failures as a people to move forward towards unity again, however I believe that no other people in America are as traditional as Black folks. Therefore certain attitudes and beliefs are handed down time and time again and to generation after generation. To those still asleep we are only four to five generations from slavery so the attitude of it’s unprofessional to have natural hair in the work place or that dark skin people are more dangerous still persist today can be attributed directly to attitudes that were handed down over the years.

    3. Are you color blind, color struck, or color stuck and why?

    Of the three suggestion that are up here I believe that I am color stuck. I want people to see and recognize me for what I am and yes that includes my skin tone. I don’t nor have I never understood the idea of a society that needs to be color blind, nor do I subscribe to the idea that darker is better than light or vis versa. I am of the belief that a person whether white or Korean or Brazilian should celebrate what they are and represent what they are through their personal works and character.

  2. 1. Do hairstyles contribute to stereotypes about Black people even among Black people?

    Yes, I believe that hairstyles contribute to stereotypes among Black People especially in the business or working world. I am a Black woman with natural hair, and I remember being told by a black employer that my afro wasn’t viewed a professional, and I should wear my hair pulled back. Even, at certain University and Private Schools throughout US locks and braids are considered not professional hairstyles. They are often considered street styles. From a historic prospective natural hairstyles were seen as a form of rebellion like in the 60’s and 70’s. But as more and more people are becoming aware of the effects of hair straightening techniques, we as a people are moving toward a more natural state. My hope is that because more of us are changing our hairstyles our view on each other will change too.

    2. Is there any validity to the theory that slavery continues to contribute to our mentality today?
    Yes, I believe that many of us are still stuck with a slave mentality, and it is one the main reasons why there is self hatred among black folks today. Many still hold beliefs that lighter is better, than darker etc. We are also brainwashed by the media who continue post images criminals being darker, and lighter skinned people being more responsible.

    3. Are you color blind, color struck, or color stuck and why?
    I am color blind, although race does play an issue in some instances. I tend to judge by action, word, or deed rather than color.

  3. 1. Do hairstyles contribute to stereotypes about Black people even among Black people?

    I believe that they do. Everyone has some level of prejudice in their being, from a combination of outside influences (i.e TV, upbringing, etc) and personal experience. Those of us that are mature try our best to rise above these prejudices and treat all people equally. Just because someone is in the same race does not mean that they are exempted from being stereotyped, at least initially. We blacks have a bountiful supply of negative stereotypes and the style of our hair usually just causes a lean towards a more select few of them. For example, if there is a black man with dreadlocks, the immediate assumption may be that he enjoys smoking marijuana….which can put him in the drug dealer category or the lazy category.

    2. Is there any validity to the theory that slavery continues to contribute to our mentality today?

    Considering that a large part of behavior and values are learned from whomever your guardian happens to be, I would have to give that theory validity. As black people we were enslaved for generations, taught that we are 2nd class, and that thinking for yourself will cause you painful repercussions. I would imagine that this way of thinking was passed on not necessarily by word, but by example. Even after gaining liberation, it is difficult to change the way that you think and approach life in general. There are several that had the strength to acknowledge this issue after becoming free and face it head on. They taught and inspired others to do the same, but we are all different. Sadly, i would imagine that there were some that had no desire to be freed and were completely lost. I cannot state what percentage of our mentality today is attributed to slavery, but I do believe that it is still a factor.

    3. Are you color blind, color struck, or color stuck and why?

    Of the three choices, color blind is what I strive to be. I give it my best attempt to treat everyone with respect. I think it is best to keep an open mind and not judge too hastily. Why? Mostly because I have learned that people are just people in the end. The color of their skin has precious little to do with their character.

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